Mutation in CPT1C causes pure autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia. JAMA Neurol 2015. Rinaldi et al.

Rinaldi C, Schmidt T, Situ AJ, Johnson JO, Lee PR, Chen KL, Bott LC, Fado R, Harmison GH, Parodi S, Grunseich C, Renvoisé B, Biesecker LG, DeMichele G, Santorelli FM, Filla A, Stevanin G, Durr A, Brice A, Casals N, Traynor BJ, Blackstone C, Ulmer TS, Fischbeck KH. Mutation in CPT1C causes pure autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia. JAMA Neurol 2015 (advance online March 9).

The family of genes implicated in hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) is quickly expanding, mostly owing to the widespread availability of next-generation DNA sequencing methods. Nevertheless, a genetic diagnosis remains unavailable for many patients.

OBJECTIVE:

To identify the genetic cause for a novel form of pure autosomal dominant HSP.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

We examined and followed up with a family presenting to a tertiary referral center for evaluation of HSP for a decade until August 2014. Whole-exome sequencing was performed in 4 patients from the same family and was integrated with linkage analysis. Sanger sequencing was used to confirm the presence of the candidate variant in the remaining affected and unaffected members of the family and screen the additional patients with HSP. Five affected and 6 unaffected participants from a 3-generation family with pure adult-onset autosomal dominant HSP of unknown genetic origin were included. Additionally, 163 unrelated participants with pure HSP of unknown genetic cause were screened.

MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURE:

Mutation in the neuronal isoform of carnitine palmitoyl-transferase (CPT1C) gene.

RESULTS:

We identified the nucleotide substitution c.109C>T in exon 3 of CPT1C, which determined the base substitution of an evolutionarily conserved Cys residue for an Arg in the gene product. This variant strictly cosegregated with the disease phenotype and was absent in online single-nucleotide polymorphism databases and in 712 additional exomes of control participants. We showed that CPT1C, which localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum, is expressed in motor neurons and interacts with atlastin-1, an endoplasmic reticulum protein encoded by the ATL1 gene known to be mutated in pure HSPs. The mutation, as indicated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies, alters the protein conformation and reduces the mean (SD) number (213.0 [46.99] vs 81.9 [14.2]; P < .01) and size (0.29 [0.01] vs 0.26 [0.01]; P < .05) of lipid droplets on overexpression in cells. We also observed a reduction of mean (SD) lipid droplets in primary cortical neurons isolated from Cpt1c-/- mice as compared with wild-type mice (1.0 [0.12] vs 0.44 [0.05]; P < .001), suggesting a dominant negative mechanism for the mutation.

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE:

This study expands the genetics of autosomal dominant HSP and is the first, to our knowledge, to link mutation in CPT1C with a human disease. The association of the CPT1C mutation with changes in lipid droplet biogenesis supports a role for altered lipid-mediated signal transduction in HSP pathogenesis.

JAMA

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